Tag Archives: how to apply to EPIK

Setting your sights on teaching English in Korea

 

Teaching English in South Korea is a very lucrative position that offers the foreigner a deep look inside life in the ROK. With many things in Korea much cheaper as opposed to life in the USA such the public transportation system, meals out, entertainment, and site seeing there are many reasons why many foreigners to give it a chance on a one year contract.

A few months before graduation I had decided to take a job as a Guest English Teacher in South Korea for various reasons. To teach for EPIK I would have the opportunity to gain teaching experience, live abroad, and earn a decent salary with many benefits. Looking back when I was applying there were many deciding factors that I was unable to answer on my own. With little information on the internet seven years ago I was getting advice from the few people I knew who were already in Korea teaching.

There are many pros and cons in the decision making but overall you want to make the right decision based on your personal and professional needs. After three years in the ROK I can safely give you the best advice based on my personal experiences, my friend’s comments, and the information available to you on the internet.

Aside from which kind of institution you would like to teach at keep in mind the fact of your placement; you may be placed rurally. Be sure to be specific as to your preference of rural of city living.

After living in rural Korea for more than a year I will say this now and say this again to any prospective English teacher: I would much prefer basing myself in the city so that I can easily get around by train and enjoy all the things that will make my life a little more convenient to have when living abroad: international dining choices, cafes galore, international expat meetups, choices of shopping, KTX and train stations to get around on weekday and weekends.

If you are based in a rural placement you will be literally spending your Monday to Friday after school there with limited bus times returning to your town in the evening. Know that you can always visit countryside temples and hiking national parks on your weekends.Remember thought that you will be limited with what you can do after work on your weekdays.

English Program in Korea (EPIK)

Public Schools in Seoul and Gyeonggi (province)(GEPIK)

Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education(SMOE)

KNOW: The English Program in Korea hires Native English Teachers in the provinces of Gangwon-do, Gyeongbuk-do, Gyeongsang-do, Chungcheongnam-do, Jeallanam-do, and lastly Jeju-do.
PROS:
• FREE accommodation provided by employer (Usually a studio or one room apartment)
• Regular working hours Monday-Friday 8:30-4:30
• Weekends OFF
• All national holidays OFF and PAID
• Communication with your regional coordinator in the case that you have questions that your co-teacher is unable to answer or solve
• Winter and Summer Vacation days OFF and PAID (At least 15 per year)
• Health care coverage (half is paid by your employer while you pay the other half; approx. 70,000 ($66 USD) deducted from your salary each month
• Regular monthly payment (25th of each month)
• Resigning bonus
• Regular contributions to pension & severance pay upon completion of your contract
• Free flight to South Korea provided by the government. Reimbursement given to you upon arrival
• Free orientation training in Seoul upon arrival

CONS of teaching in a public school:
• Last minute changes in the schedule that means that you may be teaching last minute classes or your classes are cancelled
• You cannot exactly choose your placement by city or town. You have to understand that many logistics change last minute so you are placed on need
• End of semester summer and Winter desk warming. Even though you are not scheduled to teach classes on these days you are required as per your contract to be at school during regular desk hours. This can possibly last for up to a few weeks.
• Choosing your vacation dates is planned last minute based on the dates of your schools summer and winter camp dates that the head co teacher usually decides. you cannot book ahead of time your dates for going home or elsewhere plans of abroad travel until vacation dates are planned
• Your co-teacher can make or break your teaching experience based on their personality and teaching style. That means, begin your contract on the right foot with your best intentions set
• You will be the only foreigner at your school. This can be good or this could be bad for you. If your coworkers and co-teachers are not very friendly to you or they are too shy you might feel very lonely and wish there were other foreigners there teaching English with you

Private Schools (Hagwons)
{Hagwons are located all throughout Korea in all metropolitan cities and small towns in the nine provinces through South Korea}. Keep in mind that Hagwons are after school study sessions that Korean parents pay to the private institution for their children to study and practice English with foreigners.
PROS:
• Later teaching hours ( after children complete public school at 4:30 they head to their private institutions to study with a foreigner)
• No co-teaching. You are the one in charge teaching the little monsters all that there is to know about English.
• Severance and pension contributions???
• Health care coverage (half is paid by your employer while you pay the other half; approx. 70,000 ($66 USD) deducted from your salary each month
• FREE accommodation provided by employer (Usually a studio or one room apartment)
• Free flight to South Korea provided by the government. Reimbursement given to you upon arrival
• You will have many foreigners at your workplace to socialize and mingle with to make the adjustment to living in Korea a bit smoother
• No desk warming EVER

CONS of teaching at private institutions:
• Hagwons can close at a minutes notice if there is not enough business which means you are out of a job.
• You have less vacation days per year in your contract compared to teaching at a public school. I have met foreigners who only get five vacation days per year.
TO SUM IT ALL UP:
After weighing out all of my options I think that hagwons (as long as you research well) might be the best option for teaching English abroad. With little to non-existent desk warming you are at your workplace to work, not wasting time on youtube or fiddling your fingers thinking of how to spend your day at your desk.

My biggest concern with EPIK was the amount of time wasted with next to nothing to do when my classes were cancelled due to testing and the desk warming I had to due before and after winter/summer camps. My co-workers were very busy with grading and paperwork so many times I felt completely forgotten about. Lastly I realized that there is no upward mobility in future career aspirations being an English teacher at a public school in Korea. There are no opportunities to raise the bar or expand your job experience outside of being a guest English Teacher.

I recommend Dave’s ESL Cafe to browse through job opportunities in South Korea and abroad. Most teaching contracts are a year long. For information about life in Korea check out my list of vlogs on my Youtube playlist. Good luck to you on your future choices.